Dublin cement their legacy; Gerry Thornley on Ireland’s opening World Cup match

Morning Sports Briefing: Keep ahead of the game with ‘The Irish Times’ sports team

Stephen Cluxton waves to fans as Dublin celebrate beating Kerry in the All-Ireland senior football championship final replay. Photo: Dara Mac Dónaill/The Irish Times

Stephen Cluxton waves to fans as Dublin celebrate beating Kerry in the All-Ireland senior football championship final replay. Photo: Dara Mac Dónaill/The Irish Times

And so, history has been made. The elusive spell of five All-Ireland championships in a row – never before achieved – has finally been broken. Jim Gavin’s invincible Dublin team saw off Kerry at the second time of asking on Saturday night to create history and lift the Sam Maguire once again. We have plenty of coverage for you both online and in the newspaper this morning with Keith Duggan writing that “the football landscape has been transformed from a city of clay to a city of marble. Through five full seasons Dublin remained unbeaten and so bring the GAA and Irish sporting culture into a place that had previously been the preserve of fatalistic Kerry mythology.” It was in the first game against Kerry two weeks ago when Jonny Cooper was shown a first half red card – an incident that almost saw Dublin’s history-making come crashing down. On Saturday night Cooper was back in the team and played a pivotal role in what was his redemption song, writes Malachy Clerkin.

One of the key men all season for Dublin has been Jack McCaffrey. Indeed it was his goal that was so crucial in the first game and again on Saturday he played a major role. In a world full of sterilised sporting interviews, McCaffrey is by far one of the more interesting and on Sunday morning in the Gibson Hotel he reflected on love, life, friendship and Dublin’s five-in-a-row. For Kerry it’s another final defeat to Dublin and one that stings even more so for a county that came so close to completing five-in-a-row themselves decades ago. However, there are positives to take for the Kingdom, particularly in the young age of their side which now has success in their sights. After the match on Saturday, Peter Keane spoke about how he feels the gap is bridgeable to Dublin. And finally, Malachy Clerkin writes in his Tipping Point column this morning that Dublin’s greatest sin is, in fact, making everyone outside the county root for Kerry.

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