World View: Brexit puts Irish diplomats centre-stage

Iveagh House excels at big issues such as UN and EU. Brexit will focus its energies

The EU Division has returned to Iveagh House and Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney is one of the most powerful people in the Cabinet.  Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill

The EU Division has returned to Iveagh House and Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney is one of the most powerful people in the Cabinet. Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill

You’re unlikely to find anyone in Iveagh House, the Dublin headquarters of the Department of Foreign Affairs, who thinks Brexit is a good idea. Yet Britain’s act of national self-immolation, and the gorse fires it has set off across the region, have, in a narrow institutional sense, been good for Irish diplomacy.

As the lead department in Ireland’s effort to limit its exposure to the inferno – a status it has been reclaiming from Merrion Street since it was given the Brexit brief, and the resources that go with it, earlier this year – Iveagh House suddenly has an importance in Government that it hasn’t had since the Belfast Agreement was signed two decades ago.

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.