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Fontaines DC playing their now Grammy-nominated album, A Hero’s Death, in Kilmainham Gaol: In 2020, people have leaned hard on music to cope. Photograph: Alan Betson

Fontaines DC playing their now Grammy-nominated album, A Hero’s Death, in Kilmainham Gaol: In 2020, people have leaned hard on music to cope. Photograph: Alan Betson

On Saturday night, I found myself standing outside the Church of St James in Dingle, chatting to Other Voices wrangler Philip King. The band Pillow Queens had just finished, and the crew was busy preparing the church’s stage for the next set, a live performance from a young man, David Balfe, who creates under the name For Those I Love. 

Other Voices has, remarkably, thrived during 2020. As an audience, we should be grateful for the funding it received. For a festival so deeply rooted in “being there”, the team’s experience with filming live music, being nomadic and streaming concerts here in Dingle in normal circumstances in December into pubs around the town, stood to them in ways no one could have anticipated.

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