Una Mullally: Let’s not rush to forget these lockdown days

There are echoes of childhood in this break from rat-race culture and commodification

Four-year-old Cian Walshe plays in the sea off Portmarnock Beach, Dublin, on Friday. Liberated from work and the obligations of daily life, there is a sense of air and space. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

Four-year-old Cian Walshe plays in the sea off Portmarnock Beach, Dublin, on Friday. Liberated from work and the obligations of daily life, there is a sense of air and space. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

For many, Mondays now mark the beginning of another week in limbo. Hints of normal interactions have begun to creep in. We can see some of our friends and family members. A smattering of shops have opened. Car traffic has increased. Our worlds have widened from two kilometres to five kilometres. 

I think a lot of people are experiencing echoes from childhood. Some of that is to do with the weather, and how we recall childhood summers as warm and endless. Some of it has to do with sound, and how the noises being carried through neighbourhoods are those of play and neighbours chatting. Some of it has to do with the activities we amuse ourselves with now given how limited our options are: simple pleasures of cooking, kicking a ball, walking, cycling, board games, jigsaws and drawing.

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