MetroLink needs to coexist with Dublin communities

Ranelagh opposition could mean years of metro line plans derailed yet again

Ranelagh says no. When the   MetroLink route was proposed last year, the opposition to it coalesced around the closure of the through road at Dunville Avenue to Beechwood Road. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

Ranelagh says no. When the MetroLink route was proposed last year, the opposition to it coalesced around the closure of the through road at Dunville Avenue to Beechwood Road. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

If you feel like you’ve been hearing about Dublin’s MetroLink forever, you are pretty much right. Along with Fine Gael’s Sagrada Familia – aka the national children’s hospital – the novel concept of expanding a rail network including putting parts of it underground in a capital city has long been both mooted and booted around. Now we’re in a situation where, after two decades of proposals and plans, opposition in Ranelagh could scupper the plan yet again. 

MetroLink has had an identity crisis of sorts, caught up in a muddle of pie in the sky plans over the years that oscillate between subways to expanded Luas lines and faster overground trains. But suffice to say, where we are at now, the MetroLink plan is a combination of what was the Metro North plan, the Dublin Airport to city link, the metro plans for the city centre, and then an extended line out to the southside of Dublin.  

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