Kathy Sheridan: Time to look at link between extremism and sexual violence

Many who kill in the name of religion have a history of assault on wives and partners

The UK Houses of Parliament following the attack by Khalid Masood: his wife Farzana fled their three-month-old marriage after violence from her “controlling psychopath” husband. Photograph: Chris J Ratcliffe/AFP/Getty Images

The UK Houses of Parliament following the attack by Khalid Masood: his wife Farzana fled their three-month-old marriage after violence from her “controlling psychopath” husband. Photograph: Chris J Ratcliffe/AFP/Getty Images

No evidence emerged that Khalid Masood had been radicalised in prison in 2003, or had an association with Islamic State or al-Qaeda, but “there was clearly an interest in jihad”, said Neil Basu, the senior national co-ordinator for UK counterterrorism policing, on Monday.

An “interest in jihad”. What does that mean? Was Masood, the Kent-born, 52-year-old who killed four people and inflicted catastrophic injury in Westminster last week, really all that interested in the selfless, principled “struggle in the way of God”, as sane Muslims define the word jihad?

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