How can Ireland stop global Covid-19 vaccine inequality?

Choctaw nation gave us $170 in Famine relief in 1847. It is a timeless moral lesson

People wait to be called for their Covid-19 vaccine in Cape Town, South Africa: Ireland should be doing everything to help people get vaccines worldwide. Photograph: Dwayne Senior/Bloomberg

People wait to be called for their Covid-19 vaccine in Cape Town, South Africa: Ireland should be doing everything to help people get vaccines worldwide. Photograph: Dwayne Senior/Bloomberg

I work in the national vaccination programme. It’s one of the best jobs I’ve ever had. I work with amazing people across six vaccination centres. Ireland has one of the best vaccination programmes in the world. The Government, the Department of Health, the Health Service Executive, the National Public Health Emergency Team, the National Immunisation Advisory Committee, and the National Immunisation Office have all done a brilliant job. We’re now vaccinating the last cohort in the current schedule. We’ve administered more than 6.8 million doses of vaccine; over 80 per cent of those over 12 years of age are now fully vaccinated. I should feel happy about my job. I do. And I don’t.

I blame Liam Neeson partly for the way I feel. I keep hearing him on the radio, saying “Get a Vaccine, Give a Vaccine.” Although he has a soft Ballymena accent on the Unicef ad, I also know he has a tough-guy Hollywood accent. Recently I started to imagine him saying “give a vaccine to someone in need” in the voice he uses on the phone in the Taken movies. Then I realised it was my conscience.

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