Government must avoid knee-jerk reaction to Paradise Papers

Controversy is over complex but legal methods firms use to minimise tax bills

“From the Luxembourg Leaks to the Panama Papers to the Paradise Papers there seems to be an insatiable appetite to examine the activities of businesses and individuals.” Photograph: Jon Boyes/Getty

“From the Luxembourg Leaks to the Panama Papers to the Paradise Papers there seems to be an insatiable appetite to examine the activities of businesses and individuals.” Photograph: Jon Boyes/Getty

European finance ministers yesterday blacklisted 17 countries as part of a crackdown on aggressive tax avoidance. American Samoa, Bahrain, Barbados, Grenada, Guam, South Korea, Macau, the Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Namibia, Palau, Panama, St Lucia, Samoa, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates were all listed as so-called non-compliant jurisdictions.

From the Luxembourg Leaks to the Panama Papers to the Paradise Papers there seems to be an insatiable appetite to examine the activities of businesses and individuals.

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