Finn McRedmond: Morrissey and The Simpsons are both past their sell-by date

Comedy and satire have real power but most television humour is safe and toothless

The Simpsons was once a great chronicler of suburban life and Morrissey an anti-establishment icon. They meet in an unfunny episode of the show. Still from The Simpsons

The Simpsons was once a great chronicler of suburban life and Morrissey an anti-establishment icon. They meet in an unfunny episode of the show. Still from The Simpsons

Rarely is there a story with such pleasant symmetry as “Morrissey goes to war with The Simpsons”. Both were once venerated cultural institutions, both are now struggling to cling to their depreciating relevance. Before its fall from grace, The Simpsons was the great chronicler of American suburban life. Before his fall from grace, Morrissey was an anti-establishment icon. Now these two cultural relics are tearing chunks out of each other.

A new episode of The Simpsons features a decrepit, unattractive, British xenophobic singer whose latest album is called “Refugees – Again?” (the best gag out of a bad selection). “I was [a vegan], until I found out veganism was invented by foreigners,” the character says.

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