David McWilliams: Dublin is squeezing out low-income workers

Capital generates over half of Ireland’s tax income but high rents are killing diversity

 Dublin Docklands: Canadian economist Jane Jacobs argues  against having specifically targeted “business districts” because these  areas empty out at 5pm and become wastelands. Photograph:  Alberto Pezzali/NurPhoto/Getty

Dublin Docklands: Canadian economist Jane Jacobs argues against having specifically targeted “business districts” because these areas empty out at 5pm and become wastelands. Photograph: Alberto Pezzali/NurPhoto/Getty

This week Dublin was ranked the top city in Ireland and the UK to live in, focusing attention on what makes a make a great city. All over the world, cities are driving economic growth. Ireland is no exception. Dublin is more dominant now than ever before.

Money and people are attracted to the capital for cultural, social and economic opportunities. But it’s not all one-way traffic. Dublin also gives back enormously. For example, the capital generates over half the tax revenue of the country.

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