Brexit has emboldened casual anti-Englishness among the Irish

Finn McRedmond: Nastier impulses of nationalism are increasing in scale

The average Brexit voter is far more interested in the state of public services and the NHS, unlike the Brexit pursued by Jacob Rees-Mogg, laden with lofty gestures to Britannia unchained. Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

The average Brexit voter is far more interested in the state of public services and the NHS, unlike the Brexit pursued by Jacob Rees-Mogg, laden with lofty gestures to Britannia unchained. Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Since Brexit established itself as a mainstay of political discourse, we have been treated to all manner of tedious diplomatic mudslinging. Barnier versus Boris; Dublin versus London; England versus Scotland.

In one strain of the British press, a consistent narrative emerged. Bruce Arnold wrote in the Telegraph that “little Ireland’s ridiculous leaders” were bought by Brussels; Ross Clark claimed in the Spectator that Leo Varadkar was “hung out to dry by the EU”; while a Sun editorial suggested his attempts to “wreck Brexit” had been a “suicidal failure of statesmanship”.

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