Why Britain appears to be moving backwards on Brexit

London Letter: UK and EU are at odds once again as a result of growing risk of no-deal

British prime minister Theresa May. After losing the support of one-third of Conservatives and the DUP’s 10 MPs, she appeared to be seeking to form a new majority for a Brexit deal with the help of Labour votes. Photograph: Getty Images

British prime minister Theresa May. After losing the support of one-third of Conservatives and the DUP’s 10 MPs, she appeared to be seeking to form a new majority for a Brexit deal with the help of Labour votes. Photograph: Getty Images

As MPs prepare to vote next week on how to proceed with Brexit after last week’s rejection of Theresa May’s deal, London and Brussels are marching in opposite directions.

Immediately after the defeat the prime minister invited MPs from all parties into Downing Street, signalling that a softer Brexit could be on the cards. EU negotiators made clear that the political declaration attached to the withdrawal agreement could be amended to accommodate any changes to Britain’s negotiating red lines.

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