Charlie Gard to die in hospice after court approves plan

Terminally ill boy will have life-support removed shortly after move from London hospital

Charlie Gard wanted more time with him and said he should receive life-support treatment for a number of days. Photograph: Family handout/PA Wire

Charlie Gard wanted more time with him and said he should receive life-support treatment for a number of days. Photograph: Family handout/PA Wire

 

A British high court judge has approved a plan which will see Charlie Gard “inevitably” die shortly after being moved to a hospice and having life-support treatment withdrawn.

Mr Justice Nicolas Francis had set a timetable to govern the final period of the little boy’s life.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital and the boy’s parents Chris Gard and Connie Yates disagreed over how long he should receive life-support treatment.

Medics said he should move to a hospice soon and life-support treatment should end shortly after his arrival.

His parents wanted more time with him and said he should receive life-support treatment for a number of days.

Charlie has a rare inherited disease – infantile onset encephalomyopathy mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDDS).

The condition causes progressive muscle weakness and brain damage.

The judge on Thursday made public details of an order which will result in Charlie dying shortly after moving to a hospice.

Charlie’s parents abandoned their fight to allow him to be flown to the US for experimental treatment on Monday, having determined it was no longer viable because of muscular atrophy he had suffered while the case went through the courts.

But the case was back in court on Tuesday as Great Ormond Street and Charlie’s parents again found themselves at odds, this time over where he should spend his final hours.