Secondary school students believe social media affects studies

Shapchat overtakes Facebook as most used app among Irish secondary school students

Shapchat ha snow overtakem Facebook as the most used social media app among Irish secondary school students, according to a new survey.

Shapchat ha snow overtakem Facebook as the most used social media app among Irish secondary school students, according to a new survey.

 

More than half of Irish secondary school students said social media had affected their schoolwork, a new study has found.

The second annual Student Attitudes Index by the Studyclix.ie website found 56 per cent of student said social media impact on their schoolwork while 76 per cent said they had used a smart phone to study.

The survey also found Snapchat has overtaken Facebook as the most used app among Irish secondary school students, with 90 per cent having a registered account. That is 10 per cent up on last year.

However, 88 per cent said they use Facebook, with Instagram also very popular at 81 per cent, up from 68 per cent in 2015. Twitter use trails at 50 per cent.

Increasing numbers of school students (14 per cent) said they have signed up to adult dating app Tinder with usage levels running at 32 per cent among Sligo students, 24 per cent in Clare, 19 per cent in Cork, and 8 per cent in Dublin.

The survey explored a range of topics and day-to-day issues experienced by secondary school students. It said its website is used by 57,031 registered secondary school students and also by thousands of registered secondary school teachers.

The survey involved 2,001 responses, 68 per cent girls, 32 per cent boys. Participation in the survey was heavily skewed towards students in senior years, ranging from 34 students in first years, through 123 second years, 448 third years, just 10, fourth/Transition years, 371 fifth years and 1,004 sixth years.

Where bullying is concerned, 58 per cent of the students said it is up to schools to stop bullying compared with 40 per cent who think it is the duty of online moderators and companies.

Schools should do more to stop bullying say 36 per cent of students while 39 per cent agree that LGBT students need to be better protected in schools.

The students do not think too highly of politicians with 85 per cent claiming that newly elected TDs are only out for themselves.

More generally, 52 per cent of students think it unlikely or highly unlikely they will be able to purchase a house in their home county when they begin working while 50 per cent say it is unlikely or highly unlikely that they will end up working in their home county when they finish their education.

The cost of rent will influence wherever in Ireland they choose to go to college/university 47 per cent say. When it comes to emigration 56 per cent think it ‘likely’ they will do so at some point in their lives.