Enda Kenny to visit Dublin area hit by latest gangland killing

Taoiseach tells Dáil killers have no respect for life or limb

Taoiseach Enda Kenny: condemned the murder of Gareth Hutch and the wounding of another man. Photographer: Aidan Crawley/Bloomberg

Taoiseach Enda Kenny: condemned the murder of Gareth Hutch and the wounding of another man. Photographer: Aidan Crawley/Bloomberg

 

Taoiseach Enda Kenny is to visit the Dublin north inner city community where the latest gangland killing has occurred.

Mr Kenny told the Dáil yesterday he would do so at the invitation of Dublin Central Independent TD Maureen O’Sullivan. He said he absolutely condemned the murder of Gareth Hutch and the wounding of another man.

He said it was “a vicious, murderous” dispute between two families. “And I don’t think I can stop that,’’ he said. “But I think, from the Government point of view, we can provide the resources and the wherewithal that the Garda Commissioner needs to have her forces deal with this in the way they have to.’’

When challenged by Labour leader Brendan Howlin on his remarks, Mr Kenny said he meant he personally could not stop it. But whatever resources, facilities and backing the Garda Commissioner requested from Government to protect citizens would be made available, he said.

Over the years, said Mr Kenny, gangland criminals had become more sophisticated in the way they communicated but not so much in the way they delivered their death warrants. This was still by way of guns and bullets and at times entry to locations where indiscriminate shooting took place.

Disappointing response

Fianna Fáil leader Micheal Martin said he was disappointed with the Government’s response, adding it was not just about Garda resources.

Mr Martin condemned the recent murders and said the situation was out of control. Local people, he added, were saying intimidation was rife across the community, with young people receiving up to 1200 for the distribution of tablets which was now the main drug form in the area.

There was a fundamental disregard for human life and for the community, he added.

He said local community groups were saying the supports set up from the late 1990s onwards had been eroded in recent years.

Mr Kenny said nobody disputed the fear that stalked the streets of communities.

“It is not normal to have 1,000 intensive armed checkpoints since February in any location,’’ he added. “And that is what is being done.’’

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams said the killing of Gareth Hutch was to be condemned like the other murders.

He said he had attended a community vigil in the north inner city last week and the scale of the drug trade and the neglect of those neighbourhoods were a tragic reminder of the State’s solemn obligation to ensure communities victimised by criminality had the very best policing service.