Delayed report raises possibility of new civic flag for Northern Ireland

Commission says flags supporting paramilitary organisations should not be flown

The 168-page report has already been criticised because it is not accompanied by a plan for implementing its recommendations. Photograph: Liam McBurney/PA

The 168-page report has already been criticised because it is not accompanied by a plan for implementing its recommendations. Photograph: Liam McBurney/PA

 

A long-delayed report on flags and culture in Northern Ireland has failed to find consensus on changing legislation around the flying of flags from lamp posts.

However, the commissioners behind the report have raised the possibility of developing a new civic flag for Northern Ireland.

The report said that many “challenges remain” surrounding flags, bonfires and memorials.

The 168-page report, which has cost about £800,000 (€938,500), has already been criticised because it is not accompanied by a plan for implementing its recommendations.

The Commission on Flags, Identity, Culture and Tradition (FICT) was originally set up in 2016 in a bid to find consensus on a number of contentious issues, but devolution collapsed before it could deliver a report.

Its findings were submitted to the First and Deputy First Ministers last July, and were finally published on Wednesday.

The report has made 44 recommendations but it is unlikely they will be enacted.