Tuam deaths need further investigation, says academic expert

Prof Liam Delaney says deaths cannot be explained by social conditions

Local historian Catherine Corless at the site of a mass grave for children who died in the Tuam mother-and-baby home, Galway: work was praised by Prof Liam Delaney. Photograph: PA

Local historian Catherine Corless at the site of a mass grave for children who died in the Tuam mother-and-baby home, Galway: work was praised by Prof Liam Delaney. Photograph: PA

Ireland

Prof Liam Delaney, the lead author on a 2010 study entitled From Angela’s ashes to the Celtic tiger: Early life conditions and adult health in Ireland, said the rates of infant mortality in such homes deserve to be the subject of an investigation.

Infant mortality in Ireland in the 1930s and 1940s was in the region of 70 per 1,000 or 7 per cent, as high as countries in sub-Saharan Africa have now. It was higher in Dublin than in rural areas such as Tuam running at 10 per cent because of crowded conditions and poor sanitation.

Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
only €1 first month

Insightful opinion is just a away.