Spencer Dock dwellers seek clarity on Airbnb ban

Indigo Property Management has told residents short-term lets breach agreements

The Spencer Dock Apartments, Dublin. In a letter issued to all 623 apartments, Indigo Property Management told its estimated 2,000 residents that renting out their apartments on sites such as Airbnb breaches residential agreements.   Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

The Spencer Dock Apartments, Dublin. In a letter issued to all 623 apartments, Indigo Property Management told its estimated 2,000 residents that renting out their apartments on sites such as Airbnb breaches residential agreements. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

 

A week after they were told to stop renting out their apartments through short-term let agencies such as Airbnb, some residents at the Spencer Dock apartment complex in Dublin are still unsure over what to do.

In a letter issued to all 623 apartments, Indigo Property Management told its estimated 2,000 residents that renting out their apartments on sites such as Airbnb breaches residential agreements.

Dmitry Fedoruk has been renting out his spare room on the short-term rental website since he first moved into the Dublin Docklands complex a year ago. He said the letter and ensuing ban was unexpected and unwarranted.

“They make a lot of claims,” Mr Fedoruk said. “And I can see the reasoning, but I don’t see the claims.”

Raging parties

If he had seen evidence that the apartment complex was being treated like a revolving hotel lobby, or guests were throwing raging parties every weekend, Mr Fedoruk said he would understand the apartment management company’s steps.

But the software engineer, who has been subletting for about 10 nights a month, says he has had no negative experiences with his own guests and very few with the guests of others.

For owners who are responsibly subletting, the blanket ban is unreasonable, Mr Fedoruk said.

‘Zero complaints’

“We’ve had zero complaints in a year since when we moved in,” he added. “I don’t feel it’s fair to impose it on everybody. I’m not sure they can even do that to be honest.”

While the ban won’t affect him too much financially, as it’s not his main source of income, Mr Fedoruk is still considering seeking legal counsel. He said he feels he can’t go through the legal channels on his own, however, and is worried he and other proprietors will feel it’s easier to just drop the issue.

He has stopped taking any new bookings, but has yet to decide whether he will cancel those already confirmed.

For now he is waiting to hear back from Airbnb, which he contacted seeking advice when he first received the letter.

“I’m really looking for them to stand up for us hosts,” Mr Fedoruk said.