All dogs must be ‘microchipped and registered’ by end of March

Failure to comply with regulation could lead to a fine of up to €5,000, department says

All dogs in the State should be microchipped and registered on a national database before the end of this month, Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney has said.

All dogs in the State should be microchipped and registered on a national database before the end of this month, Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney has said.

 

All dogs in the State should be microchipped and registered on a national database before the end of this month, Minister for Agriculture Simon Coveney has said.

Owners who fail to comply with the regulations, introduced as a statutory instrument last year, could face fines of up to €5,000, according to the Department of Agriculture.

Mr Coveney said the measure would have benefits for the welfare of the animals and acted as deterrent to those “who abandon dogs and assist in identifying marauding dogs and those that pose a threat to livestock or people”.

Most veterinary practices in Ireland offer microchipping and many animal welfare groups also do so, some on a subsidised basis. The cost of getting a dog microchipped by a vet is €20-€50, according to the Dog’s Trust charity.

The microchips used are about the size of a grain of rice and are inserted using a needle under the dog’s skin between its shoulder blades. The chips contain a unique 15 digit numerical code which must be registered alongside the owners details on a database.

There are currently four authorised databases operated by Animark, Fido, The Irish Coursing Club and the Irish Kennel Club. These organisations issue a certificate of registration which, under the regulations, is needed for the transfer of ownership.

Further details regarding the authorised database can be found on the department’s website.