Hundreds attend property tax rally

 

Almost 600 people attended the year's first national rally against the property tax in west Dublin this afternoon.

The meeting, organised by the Campaign Against Household and Water Taxes, was held in the Red Cow Inn, which was almost forced to initiate overflow arrangements due to the large turnout.

According to organisers, the crowd was made up of people from all around the country with a variety of different professions, with small farmers, public servants, teachers and factor workers making up a large amount.

The meeting is split into two sessions, with the first discussing relating to legislation and the second organising strategy and tactics.

According to Joan Quirke, who came from Waterford to take part in the meeting, the people who attended are there to fight for “ordinary people”.

“The Government insists on tackling the people with a middle or low income and these people barely have enough to put food in the fridge,” she said.

“I haven’t paid the household charge and from speaking to people on the street, an awful lot of people are the same and have no intention of paying it. We are going to continue on the fight, but I’m very happy to see so many people here today.”

People Before Profit councillor Brid Smith said that the only way the Government will take any action on the issue is if there is a mass-movement made by the general public, which she hopes will stem from today’s meeting.

“What we need is a mass resistance on the streets. I don’t think [the Government] will listen to us with out a mass movement and that’s what we intend to do. Just look at the amount of people who are here today. It’s entirely possible,” she said.

People Before Profit TD Joan Collins said the turnout was tremendous. “These people came from all parts of the country to be here and to have their voices heard. We are midway through a battle with the Government and we are not going to back down.”

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