Profile: Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh

 

Type: Co-educational
Age group: 12-18 years
No of students: 513 – boys: 250, girls: 263
Founded: 2006
Fee-paying: No
Uniform: Yes
Website: gcluimnigh.ie


Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh is the only co-educational interdenominational all-Irish Post-Primary college in the Limerick City region, and is the only second-level college in the area to offer boys the chance to learn through Irish at post-primary.

The relatively new college is located in the custom built Neville House in Sir Harry’s Mall. Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh is now the biggest co-ed gaelcholáiste in Ireland, but this was not always the case. Its growth has been rapid.

The school had a mere 31 pupils when it opened in 2006. That number has risen to 513 pupils in 2013, making it the fastest growing gaelcholáiste in the country.

Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh are renting the building they are currently housed in, but the Department of Education is due to carry out a review of all post-primary colleges in Limerick and management are confident a new school will be provided for them in the near future.

With a very strong focus on subject enrichment through IT, the school boasts state of the art facilities including: a technology room, laboratory, art room, music room, computer room, home economics room, language laboratory and resource room.

They also have a yard with a full sized basketball court and access to the Grove Island Leisure Centre Swimming Pool and Hall.

In addition they have a canteen, dressing rooms, and a library.

One student flexed his technical skills recently at the Smart Futures competition – a national campaign for second-level students in Ireland, highlighting career opportunities in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). The winner of the Smart Futures Junior Cycle category (1st-3rd year) was James Corneille from Gaelcholaiste Luimnigh for his website – allaboutgenetics.net – which he designed and created.

JOHN HOLDEN

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