‘Play to your strengths and remain curious’

My career path: Mary Buggy is a graduate recruit at the Central Bank

Mary Buggy: “I became interested in the changes that have occurred in the financial regulation sphere since the financial crisis. So the Central Bank of Ireland was a natural choice for me.”

Mary Buggy: “I became interested in the changes that have occurred in the financial regulation sphere since the financial crisis. So the Central Bank of Ireland was a natural choice for me.”

 

What/where did you study and when did you graduate?

My career trajectory has been somewhat unusual so far. I studied and worked in fashion design prior to graduating in 2016 with a bachelor of civil law (clinical) at University College Cork. After graduating, I did an internship in a corporate law firm in Shanghai and worked in a commercial law firm in Dublin. I then joined the Central Bank of Ireland through the graduate programme.

What attracted you to the role you now have?

While in my final year of law studies at UCC, I became interested in the changes that have occurred in the financial regulation sphere since the financial crisis. So the Central Bank of Ireland was a natural choice for me. I have been with the organisation for one year and I am deepening my understanding of how regulation applies in practice while gaining wide exposure to the financial services industry.

What did you find most challenging about the working world?

My biggest challenge has been familiarising myself with new industries and methods of work. I have become more adaptable with each change, but the work still involves learning new legal frameworks, dealing with different work practices and working collaboratively with all types of personalities. This has given me the opportunity to develop both technical ability and emotional intelligence in the workplace.

Do you have any mentors and if so what is their value to you?

The bank has a mentorship and buddy programme, which I have benefited from. It’s good to have somebody who can act as a sounding board and provide advice based on their own experiences. Beyond formal mentorship initiatives, there is a strong culture of collaboration and knowledge-sharing in the organisation. My colleagues are very generous with their time – sharing their experiences and being open to learning from others. This has been of huge value to me in building my career.

What is the most valuable thing you have learned since you joined the workforce?

I have learned that developing skills to provide value for your company or organisation does not have to occur in a linear fashion, be that through an internship, work experience, a hobby, a part-time job or, in my case, a very different prior career. All of these disparate experiences have allowed me to approach solving problems in a different way, develop attention to detail and operate well as part of a team.

One piece of advice for graduates?

Go with work you are interested in and passionate about. However, play to your strengths and remain curious.