The Yes Woman: Clickety-clack, knitting’s back

Despite the injuries and the fact I accidentally knit my scarf to my cardigan, I find that I love this ‘old’ hobby

‘I soon find myself thinking about my knitting at home as I go about my daily business.’ Photograph: Thinkstock

‘I soon find myself thinking about my knitting at home as I go about my daily business.’ Photograph: Thinkstock

It doesn’t seem coincidental that the language of knitting has a whiff of narcotics about it. Knitters use needles and work in lines; if there is any productive form of addiction, knitting must be it. Although it has become increasingly popular among younger people in recent years, it probably still suffers a little from a reputation as being stuffy and old.

Knitting might bring to mind stereotypical grandmother figures with blue rinses and descending pop socks, using phrases such as “there’s great drying out today” while they stare philosophically out the window and into a gale that could wrench trees from the earth. The truth is, however, that this lovely craft is having a bit of a Lazarus moment among younger people and gaining an increasing number of male advocates; cardigans and kitsch 1970s-style fisherman jumpers are a wardrobe staple frequently seen nestling beneath the preened facial hair of hipsters countrywide.

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