The Yes Woman: can watching Frozen put me in touch with my inner child?

The idea that adults must be adults all the time is limiting. Maybe Frozen, the defining film of childhood for a generation, will help me access my five-year-old self

Elsa from Frozen. The Disney film sends a good message to children, regardless of their gender, about resilience and independence and taking responsibility for your actions

Elsa from Frozen. The Disney film sends a good message to children, regardless of their gender, about resilience and independence and taking responsibility for your actions

As an adult without children, it’s difficult to be sympathetic to the phenomenon that is Frozen. We’re all aware of it, if only peripherally. It was Disney’s return to form. It made obscene amounts of money. It has become the defining film of childhood for a whole generation. I didn’t pay much attention, and when the frenzy for Elsa dolls began last Christmas, I rolled my eyes at the parents hacking one another down with machetes – figuratively speaking – to obtain a coveted doll for their fanatical children.

At the time, I put it down to annual seasonal lunacy and overburdened parents racked with guilt. But since sitting down to watch the film recently, I’ve considered that perhaps the children are only part of it. Certainly, a tiny person staring up at you with large, moist eyes and a facial expression conveying disillusioned bafflement in response to your telling them “Santa has run out of Frozen dolls” is motivation enough. But how many of us look into the pleading eyes that only a child pining for a plastic effigy of an animated character can have, and see ourselves as children? That birthday party that went horribly wrong; the parent who let us down; a series of disappointments. It’s natural enough to want to minimise that for your own child.

Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
only €1 first month

Insightful opinion is just a away.