70: Range Rover & Range Rover Sport – mobile luxury only a Rolls can beat

Top cars for 2019: Sees off German rivals but still haunted by lingering reliability question marks

Both Range Rover entries  are now closely mechanically related, but  the ‘Full Fat’ Range Rover has a hauteur that the Sport lacks

Both Range Rover entries are now closely mechanically related, but the ‘Full Fat’ Range Rover has a hauteur that the Sport lacks

 

We’ve conjoined the Range Rover entries because the two cars are now so closely mechanically related, but there’s no doubt that the ‘Full Fat’ Range Rover has a hauteur that the Sport lacks.

It may not be as good looking as the old 2002 L322 model, but the current Range Rover does the luxury thing exceptionally well, with a sense of refinement and comfort that you’d really need a Rolls to beat (just as well, now that Rolls-Royce makes its own SUV).

Sport is, obviously, more sporting an responsive on-road, and just as capable as the big-boy (and the Discovery) off it. Both cars can venture further, much, much further, into muck, grime, and ordure than any owner will dare to replicate, and it’s that massive engineering redundancy that forms so much of their appeal.

Both cars got updated interiors for 2018, and the arrival of much-needed plugin hybrid models, as Land Rover starts trying to wean itself off diesel at last. Both have levels of luxury to see off the best from Mercedes, BMW, and Audi, but there are lingering reliability question marks, especially in the long term.

Best model: Range Rover 4.4 SDV8 Vogue for €158,260

Price range: €78,860 to €322,470. Finance from €POA per month.

Co2 emissions: 64 to 299g/km

Sum up: Bringing luxury to the sticks for almost 50 years now.