Petite chic: The clothing brand aimed at smaller women

Style File: From keeping your head safe to petite frames and summer cover-ups

The new Russell Hobbs iron  features just one optimum heat that can be used on all ironable fabrics from silk to denim without changing the setting.

The new Russell Hobbs iron features just one optimum heat that can be used on all ironable fabrics from silk to denim without changing the setting.

 

PETITE WOW

Jennifer Ison, a former City lawyer with Irish connections, has just won a Wow award for her success as a female entrepreneur with her Jennifer Anne clothing line aimed at women with petite frames. Ison, whose grandmother and great aunts owned a dress shop called Femina in an art deco building in Wicklow Street in the 60s, followed her mother and father into law and worked as a lawyer for many years, but finally gave it up to launch her brand in 2014.

The Pym navy sweater by Jennifer Anne.
The Pym navy sweater by Jennifer Anne.

“There has been such a lack of quality clothing for the smaller woman but my brand puts them at its very heart,” says Ison who became fed up with the difficulties of finding stylish clothes to fit her small frame. The collection in sizes 6-16 consists of 54 key pieces including 18 dresses, four skirts, eight pairs of trousers, 18 tops and six jackets at prices from £85-£249 sterling. Visit https://jennifer-anne.co.uk/

SAFE IRONING

A new iron safe to use on all fabrics without adjustment has just been launched by Russell Hobbs. Called the One Temperature Iron, it features just one optimum heat that can be used on all ironable fabrics from silk to denim without changing the setting. It avoids burn and scorch marks and carries anti-drip and self-clean functions as well as a safety feature that switches the iron off after 30 seconds without use. It also boasts a 60 per cent smoother glide and avoids those awful burn marks on both the iron itself and on fabrics that can be impossible to remove. It costs €79.99 and can be found nationwide in electrical retailers.

CHECK IT OUT

Helen McAlinden’s latest collection has some good summer cover-ups – tent-shaped dresses like the Anna – with sleeves and pockets – in navy or white for easygoing weekend wear. There are also wrap dresses in emerald green or grey poplin, and a whole section on black and white micro gingham. Called Downtown, this capsule consists of a trenchcoat, a neat jacket, sleeveless dress and a sleeveless top with a cummerbund – all styled with white tees, boyfriend jeans and black separates so it updates a black winter wardrobe.

The Helen McAlinden Anna navy dress, €240.
The Helen McAlinden Anna navy dress, €240.

McAlinden who launched her label in 2001 also continues her work for Foxford Woollen Mills where she has been its brand design consultant for nearly 20 years. helenmcalinden.com 

HEAD OFF

When it comes to looking chic cycling, Catherine Bedford, founder of the stylish Dashel helmets in the UK, is something of an expert on high fashion and high function. Her recommendations include stunning tweed jackets that glow in the dark, neck warmers, coffee cup holders and bags that work all day from bike to brunch to bar.

The Dashel black helmet –the helmets are slim, lightweight and ventilated.
The Dashel black helmet –the helmets are slim, lightweight and ventilated.
The Dashel helmet in orange, by Catherine Bedford.
The Dashel helmet in orange, by Catherine Bedford.

Bedford’s cycle helmets are slim, lightweight and ventilated made from super light carbon fibre with Arpro liner – a foam that is processed using steam, water and pressure, that doesn’t degrade and dent over time and is 100 per cent recyclable. The helmets are made in Cornwall in a family owned factory that has diversified from making helmets for the military and marine industries. The Dashel (the word is Cornish for thistle) helmets come in black, white, grey, cobalt blue or orange in gloss or matt and cost €215 including postage to Ireland. Visit https://www.dashel.cc/

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