Meghan Markle's second day in Ireland starts with stylish aplomb

The duchess chose a corporate-chic style black trouser suit for her visit to Croke Park

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From her feminine-designed frocks on Tuesday, to her corporate-chic inspired looks today, Meghan Markle started day two in Dublin with stylish aplomb. Stepping out to meet President Michael D Higgins, and his wife, Sabina, in a chic taupe dress, with signature boat neck design, the style was reminiscent of the navy dress she wore the eve of her wedding to Prince Harry.

The sleek silhouetted dress was designed by friend and French fashion designer Roland Mouret, and featured feminine ruffles, and an asymmetrical skirt. The muted shade and sleek hair style gave it a business-like edge. Finishing the look, Markle accessorised with a structured top-handle handbag by Fendi, suede Paul Andrew heels and diamond earrings by Canadian jewellery company Birks.

Finding her signature style, which leans to towards sleek silhouettes, she continued the corporate-chic theme for her visit to Croke Park. Selecting a sleek black trouser suit, it was slim-fitting, with cropped cigarette trouser, worn again with Paul Andrew heels, a white relaxed t-shirt and Givenchy leather belt with gold hardware.

Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, during her visit to Croke Park. Photograph: Getty
Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, during her visit to Croke Park. Photograph: Getty

Finding her sartorial stride for her first overseas appointment since her marriage, Meghan Markle perfected the royal dress code with an elegant forest green short sleeved top and military-inspired pencil skirt by Givenchy when she arrived in Dublin on Tuesday afternoon for the couple's two-day Irish engagement. She accessorised with a tan tote bag by Strathberry and matching courts. Following the dignified fashion rules set out by the monarchy, the outfit ticked the boxes of high necked and modest hem lines, often preferred by the royal family.

After attending an event at Westminster Abbey Tuesday morning, Markle made her first change of the day from her Dior black bateau necked dress to the green ensemble. Up to now, Markle’s official royal events tour has been subdued in tone, consisting of neutral shades of soft pinks, whites and creams, which is believed to be carefully choreographed to not clash with Queen Elizabeth’s renowned bright hues. Choosing to give a subtle nod to Ireland with the choice of colour rather than designer, is thought to be another example of Markle showing sartorial respect to the Queen, who herself wore a similar dark green colour during her 2011 visit. Harry, also, honoured his grandmother by incorporating green into his look with an olive-hued tie.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle arrive at Dublin city airport on their official two day royal visit to Ireland. Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/Getty Images/Pool
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle arrive at Dublin city airport on their official two day royal visit to Ireland. Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/Getty Images/Pool

When it comes to selecting her considered royal wardrobe, another factor has been at the fore with Markle gravitating towards female-led fashion houses on official engagements, including, Prada, Goat, and Dior. Her sartorial decisions are perhaps a nod to her feminist views, with Markle declaring she was “proud to be a feminist” as she entered the Royal Family. Her chosen Givenchy ensemble for her Dublin visit seems to reflect this statement, artistic director Clare Waight Keller, of Givenchy, who also designed Markle’s wedding dress, is the first woman to helm the French fashion house.

Prince Harry and Meghan at the British Ambassador’s residence at Glencairn House in Dublin at the start of their two day visit. Photogrpah: Brian Lawless/ AFP/Getty Images
Prince Harry and Meghan at the British Ambassador’s residence at Glencairn House in Dublin at the start of their two day visit. Photogrpah: Brian Lawless/ AFP/Getty Images

 Already advocating Irish milliner Philip Treacy, speculation surrounded if Markle would select an Irish designer. Stand-outs included Louise Kennedy and Paul Costelloe. Others suggested were Simone Rocha and Orla Kiely, who have already been linked to Markle’s sister-in-law Kate Middleton. Often displaying lessons in diplomacy dressing, Middleton favours wearing designers from the visiting country on official engagements. Markle has, instead, mainly chosen subtle sartorial acumen by focusing on regional designers, choosing an independent Welsh brand Hieut Denim for her stay in Wales and a handbag by niche Scottish brand Strathbettry on her visit to Scotland in February.

Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, at an event to mark the centenary of the RAF on July 10th. Photograph: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images
Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, at an event to mark the centenary of the RAF on July 10th. Photograph: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images

 But once more female design, not Irish design was represented for Markle’s second sartorial change to attend a summer garden party at the British Ambassador to Ireland’s residence. Markle selected a chic black square-neck sleeveless dress by British designer Emilia Wickstead. An interesting choice considering Wickstead was embroiled in controversy when she commented to the Daily Mail that their was similarities to the Duchess’s Givenchy wedding dress and her own designs before releasing a statement declaring otherwise. Over on the accessories front, Markle traded in her tote for a Givenchy clutch, Aquazzura courts and drop earrings by Birks. Completing the evening-ready aesthetic, she loosened-up her sleek up-do for relaxed waves with a deep side part.

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