It’s all about spring at London Fashion Week

From its modest beginnings promoting British creativity, London Fashion Week has become a polished machine

Fashion designer Dee Dee Zaine poses for a photograph before attending a fashion presentation at Somerset House.

Fashion designer Dee Dee Zaine poses for a photograph before attending a fashion presentation at Somerset House.

 


Wet weather and overcast skies did nothing to dampen the opening of London Fashion Week yesterday in Somerset House. From its modest beginnings promoting British creativity, London Fashion Week has become a polished machine that drives the £21 billion (£25 billion) British fashion industry which employs more than 800,000 in the UK.

More than 70 shows and presentations are taking place over five days and even Princess Beatrice will be there.

“London is a destination for fashion design. We have taken it to the streets,” said Natalie Massenet, the chairwoman of the British Fashion Council at the launch, announcing the event’s first pop-up shop, with eight contemporary designers, which will be open to the public.

“We want London fashion week to be more inclusive and our designers to have more contact with consumers. London street style inspires trends around the world,” she said.

Bora Aksu
Kickstarting the first of the spring-summer 2014 presentations was London-based Turkish designer Bora Aksu. His collection was called “Nazar” and was inspired by childhood memories of summers by the Aegean.

Native handwoven fabrics like those used in traditional Turkish towels were recreated in new and fresh ways for a series of lighthearted, feminine dresses with tasselled trims and blue-and-white seaside stripes.

His model line up included 16-year-old Clara McSweeney from Macroom, Co Cork, who is due to be in a number of catwalk shows this season.

Best collection of the day was that of Seoul designer Jackie Lee whose sleek, sporty pink suits and separates, along with playful tailoring of gingham PVC, brought a real sense of summer days to come.