How do you wear a lace dress without looking bridal?

Stylefile: Team lace with something casual to draw away from a ‘special occasion’ look

WearingIrish NYC and Bank of Ireland are giving eight of Ireland’s best fashion/accessories designers the opportunity to showcase their creations in New York in May

WearingIrish NYC and Bank of Ireland are giving eight of Ireland’s best fashion/accessories designers the opportunity to showcase their creations in New York in May

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The trick to wearing lace without looking bridal is to team it with something casual, drawing it away from a “special occasion” look. A lace dress for spring and summer is best in black or a solid colour, but this ruffle lace blouse (€55) from River Island worn with a black high waisted skirt or trousers and dramatic chandelier earrings shows how to adapt a Victorian look in a controlled, modern way. The spring / summer collection (in store now) also includes a more risqué sheer black lace skirt embellished with floral velvet embroidery (€75).

Ruffle lace blouse (€55 from River Island)
Ruffle lace blouse (€55 from River Island)

WearingIrish NYC

Eight of Ireland’s best fashion/accessories designers will have the unique opportunity to showcase their creations in New York to consumers and influencers over a 48 hour period in May, thanks to a competition launched by Margaret Molloy of WearingIrish NYC partnered with Bank of Ireland. Applications are open now at www.wearingirish.com and winners will be announced during the St Patrick’s Day celebrations in New York on 16 March.

With a packed programme and speakers from the New York fashion and business community, as well as prominent members of the Irish diaspora, it will be a great opportunity for young designers with ambitions towards the US market. The movement is the brainchild of Molloy, an Offaly native, graduate of Harvard Business School and New York based global chief marketing officer of Siegel+Gale, and Francesca McDonagh, group CEO at Bank of Ireland. “Promoting design and fashion is a concrete way to demonstrate Ireland’s creativity” says Molloy.

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