Brown Thomas fashion show sends out signal on season of themes

BT fashion show gives glimpse of upcoming autumn/winter clothes collections

This is a season of contrasts and contradictions – of minis and maxis, of the retrospective and futuristic, of masculine and feminine, of embellishment and clean lines.

 

This is a season of contrasts and contradictions – of minis and maxis, of the retrospective and futuristic, of masculine and feminine, of embellishment and clean lines, attendees of the Brown Thomas preview of the autumn/winter 2015 fashion collections were told.

“So it’s less about trends and more about themes; there is something for everyone,” said Shelly Corkery, director of womenswear.

With almost a hundred outfits complete with accessories on the catwalk, this was a strong show that highlighted some of the most beautiful – and expensive – star pieces from premier international brands.

Though a lot of grey, khaki and brick tones predominated, the event was bookended with winter white, opening with an embroidered close-fitting sheath from Peter Pilotto and ending with an exquisite white caped gown by Valentino, ideal for the red carpet. In between was a rich variety of looks, colours, textures and shapes.

Black number

Stella McCartneyVictoria Beckham

Dolce and Gabbana took decor even further, encrusting a pink cape and dress with lavish rose-strewn embroidery using jewelled red headphones to accessorise a shapely black dress.

A pale yellow knit with “J’aime maman” in gold sequins worn with a pretty pale blue skirt was a twosome some mothers might love. As for other knitwear, Valentino referenced Aran-style cable knits slashed with black and worn with long, black skirts. For trousers, take your pick; flared, floor-length or slim-fitting.

Elsewhere there were calm two-pieces and flattering tunic styles from The Row and Marni, a standout strapless jumpsuit from Stella McCartney while McQueen’s black lace dresses with high ruched necks had that modern Victorian elegance typical of his style. Footwear matched the mood of the clothes – either flat and decorative or high, painted, camouflaged or laced.