Seven foods that will leave you with smoother skin

Swap your expensive serum for a diet that includes spinach and pineapple

A slice of lemon in warm water is a natural detoxifier

A slice of lemon in warm water is a natural detoxifier

 

Lemons

A slice of this yellow wonder fruit in some warm water is the perfect way to start the day.

Yes, we know they generally taste better in a gin and tonic but in the morning – with only water as a mixer – lemons kick start the liver. Forget that “detox diet” and give your natural detoxifier a helping hand tomorrow morning.

Spinach

This leafy green is full of vitamin A, which helps skin and hair growth, as well as vitamin C, which is an essential aid in collagen production.

So, instead of investing in that expensive vitamin C serum, maybe try some spinach with your dinner?

Beetroot and cherries

Beetroot and cherries are full of antioxidants, which help the body protect itself against free radicals and, in doing so, prevent fine lines and wrinkles. They also contain vitamin C and vitamin A.

Pineapple

This marvellous fruit contains vitamin C, antioxidants and bromelain. Bromelain reduces inflammation, making pineapple great for someone wanting to lessen the appearance of rosacea.

It also helps with acne, as the vitamin C encourages skin to heal itself, while the bromelain helps prevent new breakouts.

Almonds

Almonds are a rich source of vitamin E, a vitamin naturally present in the dermis which gives skin its smoothness and suppleness. And yes, eating more than 12 is encouraged.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes, as well as fish, eggs, broccoli and Brazil nuts, are packed with the antioxidant selenium, which works alongside other antioxidants to protect skin against things such as age spots and skin cancer.

Sugar

Sorry, but this is actually one to avoid.

When you eat sugar, your body produces enzymes that break down collagen and elastin in your skin. And you really need that stuff to keep your skin smooth, so it’s best to avoid sugar – if at all possible.

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