If you suffer with red cheeks, try a colour corrector

Thick green sludge is the saviour of rosy-cheeked women, so slap it on

“If you suffer from red cheeks, like so many Irish women, try popping some green goop all over them.”

“If you suffer from red cheeks, like so many Irish women, try popping some green goop all over them.”

 

First there was contouring, then strobing, and then there was nontouring. Soon after there was draping. And now, ladies and gentlemen, there is colour correcting. While this technique has been around the block before, I’m hoping that the new wave of enthusiasm is for colour correcting sticks. Because of all of these “skin trends” it’s the one that makes the most sense, and leaves you with the most natural(ish) appearance. It does involve covering your face in green sludge, but anything for a pretty face, right?

Contouring uses light and dark to carve out cheekbones, narrow your face and highlight your eyes. There seems to be approximately 3,456 different ways to do this. This look is not natural, finding its origins in drag and stage makeup. Then there is strobing, which is basically highlighting, but all over your face.

Nontouring is all in the name, as it involves no contouring whatsoever. It leaves me with a face that that resembles a look I worked as a 15-year-old, when layering on a thick layer of foundation, and very little else. Draping is basically applying a dark blush to the apples of your cheeks, Farah Fawcett style.

But colour correcting, well it’s science. Colour theory says that opposite colours on the colour wheel cancel each other out. So if your skin is looking a little tired and yellow, grab yourself some purple, like Becca’s First Light Priming Filter (€37 from Space NK). If you suffer from red cheeks, like so many Irish women, try popping some green goop all over them. Smashbox do a great green primer (€34 Boots) but if you have any friends going to the US, Cicapair Tiger Grass Color Correcting Treatment is the product you want. It’s really thick and green, and putting it on your face feels a bit wrong, but trust and watch the green disappear and a glowing natural complexion rise to the surface.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.