Five facial mists and how to use them

Do not get any notions - few products are as versatile and convenient as facial mists

There are few products as versatile and convenient as a facial mist, and few which are as useful in both make-up application and skincare use.

There are few products as versatile and convenient as a facial mist, and few which are as useful in both make-up application and skincare use.

 

There is little in life that gives me purer joy than good skincare. The smells and textures give me sincere joy, and the results that good products can give make me (always a bit nervous about my skin as an ex-acne sufferer) look and feel noticeably better. I am one of those people who will always try a new product or delivery method, but even I can see why, to the uninitiated, facial mists appear like pure and utter notions.

There are, however, few products as versatile and convenient as a facial mist, and few which are as useful in both make-up application and skincare use. Even problem skin can benefit from a mist. La Roche Posay Serozinc (€10.49 for 150mls from Boots) has very few ingredients, and is wonderfully calming, particularly on rashy or broken-out skin. It also works very well for nappy rash and can be used on babies’ bums.

 MAC Sized to Go Prep and Prime Fix + (€12 for 30mls from Brown Thomas) is the product most people associate with facial mists, and for good reason – it is excellent. You can use it as traditionally dictated to set your finished make-up and take the dusty look from powdered skin. My favourite way to use it, however, is when I have to go out in the evening and can’t be bothered to redo make-up I have been wearing all day. I reapply liquid concealer where needed, but before blending with a small clean fluffy brush, I mist my face liberally with the convenient mini version of Fix +. Once the concealer is blended into damp skin, foundation looks entirely fresh.

UK brand West Barn Co is run by a mother-daughter duo, and its products – prioritising natural and organic ingredients – must be tried to be believed. The Coconut Dew Mist (£16 for 100mls from westbarnco.com) is nothing short of sumptuous and leaves make-up or skin with a beautifully glowing finish. It is also ideal for turning powder products into liquid. Scrape a little powder blush from its pan, mix with a spritz of this, and you have an incredibly lovely liquid blush which blends into the skin seamlessly without looking like make-up.

Allies of Skin Molecular Saviour Mist (€45 for 30mls from fetchbeauty.com) is serious skincare and has a price tag to match. An expensive serum can be made to go further and work harder if applied to damp skin. This mist is not to faffed about with, given the price, so I layer it under serum to improve its efficacy and ensure I don’t have to apply as much product. It works.

To counteract central heating and the four o’clock slump, I keep a mist at my desk. Caudalie Beauty Elixir (€12.50 for 30mls from Arnotts) is the ideal “wake up” mist, but is also effective as a make-up setting spray or for skincare layering. It contains a little mint and rosemary, making it invigorating, but close your eyes when you spritz it on to prevent watering.

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