Aisling on beauty: Don’t forget your booster shots

These vials of concentrated ingredients will give your existing serum or moisturiser a shot in the arm

Clarins Booster shots

Clarins Booster shots

 

Skincare boosters or shots are vials of highly concentrated ingredients. If you want to add some extra benefits to your existing serum or moisturiser, beauty shots are a great option.

Philosophy Turbo Booster C Powder has been around for some time. Just add a tiny scoop to your water-based moisturiser: it will dissolve easily and help to reduce age spots and dingy skin. If you need a booster to clear blocked pores and reduce spots, Dr Perricone Clarifying Activator, which includes salicylic, malic and glycolic acids, is just the ticket.

Clarins has developed a range of Booster shots, which I love. I particularly like the Detox booster, which has ingredients to liven up dull skin. The Repair option helps to calm down weather-beaten and reddened skin.

Om skincare (available in SpaceNK) is effective. The Revitalizing booster will add a concentrated mix of hyaluronic acid and vitamin C to your existing skincare.

Or you could mix your existing skincare to make your own booster. I do this when a serum doesn’t seem to suit me or I feel like combining two together. The combination of hyaluronic acid (which attracts water) and vitamin C (a skin brightener) are capable of providing excellent skincare benefits. I mix Kiehl’s vitamin C with a hyaluronic serum I picked up in Lidl. The blend feels so much better and more moisturising than the serums did individually.

Alternatively, add a couple of drops of facial oil to your moisturiser and you have already created your own booster and helped to protect your skin against dehydration.

The only skincare you shouldn’t dilute is anything with SPF, because it could dilute the sun-protection effect.

Buckle your seatbelts, because we are going to see more and more of this kind of customisable skincare.

  • amcdermott@irishtimes.com
  • Twitter @aismcdermott
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