Arnott’s windows celebrate 1916

A new exhibition ‘Uniformity’ in Arnotts windows in Dublin features the work of Griffith College 2nd year fashion students and celebrates the unique story of twelve Cumann na mBan volunteers

A new exhibition ‘Uniformity’ in Arnotts windows in Dublin features the work of Griffith College 2nd year fashion students and celebrates the unique story of twelve Cumann na mBan volunteers who were central to the 1916 Rising. Video: Bryan O'Brien

 

In the windows of Arnott’s a new exhibition entitled ‘Uniformity’ is celebrating the stories of the women of 1916. In place until the end of March, the exhibition features designs by Griffith College 2nd year fashion students who took inspiration from twelve Cumann na mBan volunteers, central to the Rising.

The outfits celebrate the unique stories of each woman and their involvement in the events of 1916. Among the well-known women featured are Countess Markievicz, Jennie Wyse Power, and Elizabeth O’Farrell, many of whom went on to prominent roles in the new Irish Free State. Each outfit, made from olive green material combines modernity with history.

Jane Leavey, head of fashion at Griffith College, said: “It is fantastic to be a part of Arnotts’ commemoration of 1916. At Griffith College, we pride ourselves on developing graduates who are industry ready to work in the fashion sector. This is a wonderful opportunity for our students to showcase their creativity and design skills in one of Ireland’s leading department stores.”

Damien Byrne, Head of Creative at Arnotts, said “We were delighted to collaborate with Griffith College to honour some of the women behind the 1916 Rising. Given our close proximity to the GPO, we felt it was important to celebrate and commemorate this moment in history through the lens of fashion. We have always endeavoured to nurture the talent of young Irish designers and I know that our customers will enjoy the contemporary clothing design interpretation of some of the women from the Rising. Each piece tells the story of these heroic women.”

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