Top stories on Irish Times Abroad this week

NZ seeks Irish teachers, Late Late in London, and how culture shock leads to depression

The “culture shock” experienced by some people after they move country can often lead to anxiety or depression. Shaun Lavelle spoke to Irish immigrants and mental health experts in the Netherlands.

The “culture shock” experienced by some people after they move country can often lead to anxiety or depression. Shaun Lavelle spoke to Irish immigrants and mental health experts in the Netherlands.

 

Would you like to be able to have your say on who will be the next President of Ireland, but can’t because you currently live abroad? Ireland is one of the only countries in the developed world that doesn’t have a system to allow overseas citizens a vote, so ahead of the election and blasphemy referendum next week, we’ve set up a bespoke tool to allow you to have your say in a “virtual vote” on both issues. More than 2,000 of you had your say in a similar virtual vote for the Eighth Amendment in May. You must be a member of the Irish Times Abroad Network (which is free to join), and opted in to participate in polls. To do both, click here. You’ll receive your ballot paper by email on Monday.

We featured two impactful stories on mental health this week that are worth reading if you haven’t already: Shaun Lavelle spoke to emigrants and experts in the Netherlands to explore how the “culture shock” experienced by people after they move country can often lead to anxiety or depression; and Ali Baker shared her experience of losing her brother to suicide, her own struggles with mental health in the aftermath, and how Pieta House and the Light Ball Sydney (which takes place this weekend), helped her pull through.

If you work in education and are looking for a fresh start, New Zealand is advertising for hundreds of teachers from abroad, including Ireland, to fill vacant jobs around the country next year. Peter McGuire takes a look at the positions, salaries and relocation bonuses on offer , and how they compare to Ireland.

From infamy as a petty criminal to fame as an artist, “Tattoo Man” Samuel O’Reilly’s life was certainly a colourful one. The Irish-American who invented the modern tattoo machine is this week’s Extraordinary Emigrant.

The Late Late Show broadcast from London last weekend, and the reaction from Irish people living there has been far from positive. Tanya Sweeney’s review echoes the consensus: ‘A glorified town hall shindig’.

You’ll find plenty more stories by and about the Irish diaspora this week on irishtimes.com/abroad.

To receive this digest to your inbox each week, you can join the free Irish Times Abroad Network here.Thanks for reading.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.