Lord Mayor calls for protection of local rights ahead of Croke Park gigs

Spokesman confirms that Bruce Springsteen will not play summer gigs at GAA venue

Bruce Springsteen with his wife Patti Scialfa. The Boss may perform two dates in Croke Park this summer. Photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

Bruce Springsteen with his wife Patti Scialfa. The Boss may perform two dates in Croke Park this summer. Photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

 

Lord Mayor Christy Bourke has said a structure is needed to protect the rights of the local community around Croke Park, regardless of which artist plays the stadium this summer.

The Lord Mayor’s comments come amid fresh rumours that rock-veteran Bruce Springsteen could be set to perform two dates in Croke Park this summer. The rumour has since been dismissed by a spokesperson for Springsteen, who stated The Boss will not be touring this summer.  Meanwhile, 23-year-old singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran is also rumoured to be on the schedule for the GAA stadium’s summer line-up.

“Lessons need to be learned after what happened last year,” said Mr Bourke, adding he had not seen an application for a Bruce Springsteen concert in 2015.

“It doesn’t matter who it is, a structure needs to be put in place in order to protect and secure the community.”

Irish rockers The Script were unveiled as the 2015 Croke Park headline act last October, with the Dublin band set to play the stadium on June 20th.

A spokeswoman for Croke Park has failed to comment on the remaining two dates of the 2015 summer line-up, while Aiken Promotions has denied the possibility of an upcoming Springsteen gig.

Refund owing

Last summer Garth Brooks’s five sell-out concerts in Croke Park were called off after Dublin City Council refused to licence two of the shows due to objections from local residents.

Brooks pulled all five concerts claiming that being asked to pick just three of the five was “like asking to choose one child over another”.

Nearly six months on, more than €120,000 worth of Garth Brooks tickets from the concerts have yet to be refunded.

Dublin City Cllr Paul McAuliffe said that under the current rules two more concerts can be organised in Croke Park this summer without applying for a licence.

“So whether it’s Ed Sheeran or another act, it’s likely they will only hold two nights,” he said.

Solicitor Anthony Fay, who represented a number of local residents in their dispute with Croke Park regarding the Brooks concerts called on Minister for the Environment Alan Kelly to bring forward the proposed legislation to regulate public performances taking place in open air around the State.

“Legal reform will help to avoid the same chaotic results experienced by concert-goers, residents, the event management and hospitality industries last summer,” he said.