Kanye West: Kim Kardashian breaks silence on rapper’s bipolar disorder

Kardashian West described her husband's illness as 'incredibly complicated to understand'

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West: He is a "brilliant but complicated person". Photograph: Toni Anne Barson/WireImage

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West: He is a "brilliant but complicated person". Photograph: Toni Anne Barson/WireImage

 

Kim Kardashian West has spoken for the first time about her husband rapper Kanye West’s bipolar disorder after a string of concerning tweets posted by the rapper, which have since been deleted.

Writing on her Instagram account, she said: “As many of you know, Kanye has bi-polar disorder. Anyone who has this or has a loved one in their life who does, knows how incredibly complicated and painful it is to understand. I’ve never spoken publicly about how this has affected us at home because I am very protective of our children and Kanye’s right to privacy when it comes to his health.

“But today, I feel like I should comment on it because of the stigma and misconceptions about mental health. Those that understand mental illness or even compulsive behaviour know that the family is powerless unless the member is a minor.

“People who are unaware or far removed from this experience can be judgmental and not understand that the individual themselves have to engage in the process of getting help no matter how hard family and friends try.”

Konfessional mode: Kanye and Kim in the new series of Keeping Up with the Kardashians. Photograph: E!
Kanye West and Kim Kardashian. Photograph: E!

Early on Wednesday, Kanye West said on Twitter he has been trying to divorce his wife, in a message that was deleted minutes later. “I been trying to get divorced since Kim met with Meek at the Warldolf for prison reform,” West wrote in the message, without elaborating further.

Late on Monday, West posted a series of tweets, which were also later deleted, claiming his wife was trying to have him locked up on medical grounds and comparing himself to Nelson Mandela.

An emotional Kanye West during his rally in North Charleston on Sunday. Photograph: Lauren Petracca/The Post And Courier/AP
An emotional Kanye West during his rally in North Charleston on Sunday. Photograph: Lauren Petracca/The Post And Courier/AP

Those came a day after West launched his US presidential campaign with a rambling rally in Charleston, South Carolina. At that event, he tearfully referenced a decision he said he made with his wife not to terminate a pregnancy.

West (43), a former supporter of President Donald Trump, has left voters befuddled over whether his campaign is genuine or a publicity stunt to help sell albums or merchandise.

In her Instagram post, Kardashian said that due to West’s bipolar disorder “his words some times do not align with his intentions”.

“I understand Kanye is subject to criticism because he is a public figure and his actions at times can cause strong opinions and emotions,” she wrote.

“He is a brilliant but complicated person who on top of the pressures of being an artist and a black man, who experienced the painful loss of his mother, and has to deal with the pressure and isolation that is heightened by his bipolar disorder.

“Those who are close with Kanye know his heart and understand his words some times do not align with his intentions.

“Living with bipolar disorder does not diminish or invalidate his dreams and his creative ideas, no matter how big or unobtainable they may feel to some. That is part of his genius and as we have all witnessed, many of his big dreams have come true.

“We as a society talk about giving grace to the issue of mental health as a whole, however we should also give it to the individuals who are living with it in times when they need it the most.

“I kindly ask that the media and public give us the compassion and empathy that is needed so that we can get through this. Thank you for those who have expressed concern for Kanye’s well being and for your understanding.” – PA, Reuters

Contact:
Samaritans: Phone 116 123, text 087 260 9090, email jo@samaritans.ie
Pieta House: Phone 1800 247 247, text HELP to 51444
Aware: Phone 1800 804 848, email supportmail@aware.ie
Alone: Phone 0818 222 024. 

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