Damon Albarn: ‘Brexit has revealed terrible truths about the mental health of the English’

The Blur frontman on ‘Merrie Land’, Britpop, Oasis, Morrissey and John Lydon

Damon Albarn: “I’ve always been very strong on finishing work at five and cooking dinner.” Photograph: Tom Jamieson/New York Times

Damon Albarn: “I’ve always been very strong on finishing work at five and cooking dinner.” Photograph: Tom Jamieson/New York Times

With the honourable exceptions of The Traveling Wilburys, Cream, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and The Jimi Hendrix Experience, supergroups tend to be makeshift vanity projects that rarely last the distance. The Good, The Bad & The Queen are another matter entirely. The quartet stars Paul Simonon, the iconic bassist famously pictured on the cover of London Calling by The Clash, Simon Tong of The Verve, Afrobeat pioneer Tony Allen, who Brian Eno hails as the greatest drummer who has ever lived, and of course, the former Britpop poster boy turned musical chameleon extraordinaire Damon Albarn.

Their second album, Merrie Land, is partially inspired by the chaos caused by the entire fiasco we politely call Brexit.

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