Phil Coulter on Bloody Sunday: ‘You just felt the whole city had been violated’

The consequences of that day left a lasting impact on the lives of the people of Derry

British soldiers stand behind an armoured water cannon and armoured cars as tensions rise on Bloody Sunday in Derry. Photograph: William L Rukeyser/Getty

British soldiers stand behind an armoured water cannon and armoured cars as tensions rise on Bloody Sunday in Derry. Photograph: William L Rukeyser/Getty

In Derry almost everyone has a story about Bloody Sunday. Those who were children at the time remember playing football on the street as the news of the shootings filtered back that Sunday afternoon, or being sent home from school by their teachers as a protest the following day.

Others remember the pall that fell over the city, the rain that poured like tears on the day of the funerals, or the brothers and sons who joined the IRA as a result. Most of all, they remember the victims – their relatives, friends and neighbours.

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