Taytos, wine, Dublin Bay: What Charlie’s Angels star Elizabeth Banks likes about Ireland

The US actor and director has moved her family to Ireland to make Cocaine Bear

Tayto fan: Elizabeth Banks shows her followers a packet of cheese and onion. Photograph: Twitter/Elizabeth Banks

Tayto fan: Elizabeth Banks shows her followers a packet of cheese and onion. Photograph: Twitter/Elizabeth Banks

 

The Hollywood actor and film director Elizabeth Banks has just moved to Ireland to make her new movie – and she’s already partial to a packet of Tayto crisps, according to a video she has posted on social media.

The Hunger Games and Pitch Perfect star, who also wrote, directed and appeared in the 2019 version of Charlie’s Angels, says she has brought her whole family with her while she works on Cocaine Bear, a film inspired by the 1985 case of an American black bear that overdosed after finding a batch of the drug. The New York Times reported that the cocaine had apparently been dropped from a plane piloted by a drug smuggler who had died three months earlier, after carrying too heavy a load while parachuting.

In the 30-second clip she has posted on Twitter, Banks gives her followers a quick tour of her new home and its attractions, including cheese-and-onion Taytos, the Mitchell & Son wine shop in Glasthule, and the local beach, on the southern shore of Dublin Bay, where she takes her sons, 10-year-old Felix and eight-year-old Magnus. Banks, who also starred alongside Cate Blanchett and Rose Byrne in the TV drama Mrs America last year, poses with a Tricolour, too – and gets to grips with driving on the wrong side of the road.

Filming is due to start on Cocaine Bear in August, making it just the latest Hollywood movie to be shot here: Amy Adams and Patrick Dempsey are filming Disenchanted, the sequel to Enchanted, in Co Wicklow; and Chris Pine and Hugh Grant have been filming scenes for Dungeons & Dragons in Carrickfergus, in Co Antrim.

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