War for Eternity: philosophical roots of Steve Bannon’s populism

Benjamin R Teitelbaum offers engrossing insight into emergence of alt-right ideology

Former adviser to the US president Steve Bannon: sought “to harness the disruptive anti-democratic radicalism that was hiding in public apathy”. Photograph: Joel Saget/AFP

Former adviser to the US president Steve Bannon: sought “to harness the disruptive anti-democratic radicalism that was hiding in public apathy”. Photograph: Joel Saget/AFP

In what world do the paths of mysticism, anti-modernism, anti-Semitism, neo-nazism, alt-right counterculture, far-right syndicated news and high-tech meta-data collection collide? What could possibly connect these disparate, contradictory and, in most cases, fringe elements of modern politics and culture? It this even important? Should we care?

For journalist and ethnographer Benjamin R Teitelbaum, the answer to this last question is most certainly yes. Grasping the connection is of enormous importance both in understanding the ideological underpinnings of right-wing populism and, more importantly, its impact on governments in Hungary, Brazil, Russia and the United States.

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