The Poems of Dorothy Molloy: lost jewels rescued

Love, illness, death, abusive behaviour and Spain rhyme in this posthumous collection

Dorothy Molloy: her poems acquire new layers of meaning when read in the context of independence in Catalonia and the exhumation of Franco’s remains.

Dorothy Molloy: her poems acquire new layers of meaning when read in the context of independence in Catalonia and the exhumation of Franco’s remains.

“If I knew where poems came from, I’d go there,” once confessed Michael Longley after emerging from a period of writer’s block. He was thus acknowledging that a poet’s talent to assemble words and images successfully, their out-of-the-ordinary, at times magical and usually respected, perception of the world is not enough to make a poem work.

The craft draws its seeds from inexplicable sources indeed, but it is also a full time job not without its barren seasons. Or, as Pablo Picasso declared, “inspiration exists, but it has to find you working”.

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.