The best new young-adult fiction: The thrills and terrors of piloting

The Gravity of Us brilliantly tackles several issues at once without a heavy-handed lecture

Elizabeth Wein uses her expert knowledge of aviation in her latest  second World War aviation thriller The Enigma Game

Elizabeth Wein uses her expert knowledge of aviation in her latest second World War aviation thriller The Enigma Game

We are all prone to certain parts of the media consumed in our childhood leaving their mark on us. For me a key text was Sleepless in Seattle, a movie its director and co-writer Nora Ephron once explained thus: “Our dream was to make a movie about how movies screw up your brain about love and then if we did a good job we would become one of the movies that screwed up people’s brains about love forever.” (Cheers Nora.)

There’s something pleasing and immensely satisfying about works that acknowledge, dissect and interrogate the tropes of a particular genre while also replicating the best of them – works that recognise that their reader or viewer or consumer is savvy and critical but still in love with story and the building blocks that help the story along.

The Irish Times
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