Starve Acre: brilliantly written work of folk horror

Andrew Michael Hurley sketches grief, belief and the supernatural around a child’s death

Andrew Michael Hurley: seamlessly intertwines the malignant savagery of nature with abstract use of imagery for horror effect.  Photograph: Hal Shinnie

Andrew Michael Hurley: seamlessly intertwines the malignant savagery of nature with abstract use of imagery for horror effect. Photograph: Hal Shinnie

Andrew Michael Hurley has carved a niche for himself in contemporary literature with his sublimely eerie novels that deftly tread the line between folklore and gothic fiction.

Authors of horror novels are usually quickly pigeonholed as commercial writers but I don’t think any of the other writers right now are in the same league as Hurley. His sophisticated stories usually broach ethereal themes, steeped in the traditions of supernatural and psychological realism.

The Irish Times
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