Something Out of Place: Women & Disgust by Eimear McBride

McBride’s nonfiction debut serves us a timely reminder of misogyny’s enduring resilience

Author Eimear McBride places the daily traumas she’s previously flooded with rich, intuitive prose in a critical context in her nonfiction debut. Photograph: Eric Luke

Author Eimear McBride places the daily traumas she’s previously flooded with rich, intuitive prose in a critical context in her nonfiction debut. Photograph: Eric Luke

Eimear McBride is known for writing about the female body. Her visceral novels (A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing, The Lesser Bohemians and Strange Hotel) depict women’s desire and agency as well as their attendant perils: an inner life dogged by self-doubt, sex that seamlessly pivots from ambivalent to violent.

Something Out of Place: Women & Disgust is McBride’s nonfiction debut, and it places the daily traumas she’s previously flooded with rich, intuitive prose in a critical context. The precarities that plague women’s lives are rooted, McBride argues, in “a disgust that appears to mystically attach itself to the female body at birth”. It is this disgust that accounts not only for the double-binds women live by but the high price they pay for their perceived transgressions.

The Irish Times
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