Lost, Found, Remembered by Lyra McKee: pride and pain

Activist and writer’s insight and optimism evidenced in volume as short as her life

The late Lyra McKee: was willing to look fearlessly at the worst flaws in the North while never losing a sense of hope for the place. Photograph: Jess Lowe

The late Lyra McKee: was willing to look fearlessly at the worst flaws in the North while never losing a sense of hope for the place. Photograph: Jess Lowe

Reading this collection of the late Lyra McKee’s work can be a painful experience. Not because of the writing, which is humane and curious, but because of the reader’s ever-present knowledge of what happened to the author.

McKee’s dominant theme is that of buried trauma refusing to be buried, and instead returning to harm later generations. So it is impossible to read her work on this subject without being angry at the horrible irony that she would herself become another victim of the unresolved conflict. A year on from her death, the talent evident in this volume does nothing to leaven the senselessness of her death – instead it draws even starker attention to it.

The Irish Times
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