Ilya Kaminsky's Deaf Republic: poetry in a world shaped by a boy's killing

Poetry round-up: Karen Solie's The Caiplie Caves introduces the 7th-century Irish saint Ethernan as its main protagonist, plus new collections from Miriam Gamble and Derek Coyle

Karen Solie: The Caiplie Caves,  a notable absentee from the Forward Prize list. Photograph: David Seymour

Karen Solie: The Caiplie Caves, a notable absentee from the Forward Prize list. Photograph: David Seymour

The poetry of allegory seems to require a style which risks bare-bones sparseness, patiently avoiding idioms or historical references which might tip the reader off too quickly to any one ostensible subject.

Ilya Kaminsky’s Deaf Republic (Faber, £10.99) adopts just such a simple style: clear but affectless images are set alongside matter-of-fact reports of violence in the book’s imagined republic, a world shaped by the killing of a deaf boy by soldiers.

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