Diamonds at the Lost and Found: Satisfying memoir about a sassy Scouser

Sarah Aspinall’s memoir of childhood with her social-climbing mother is engrossing

Audrey is a puzzle that Sarah Aspinall spent her childhood and youth trying to solve. Photograph: Getty

Audrey is a puzzle that Sarah Aspinall spent her childhood and youth trying to solve. Photograph: Getty

The quest for power of one sort or another dominates human existence and it’s probably why we long for superpowers, something extra-human and unbeatable. But of the merely human powers there is none more potent than that of parental influence: it insinuates itself before it can be rebelled against and it cannot be undone.

When British film-maker Sarah Aspinall was born in 1957, she was immediately and forcefully under the influence of her good-time girl mother, Audrey, who lived a technicolour life driven by the conviction that she should’ve been a contender both in life and love.

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