Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young: When egos clashed in the golden age of the Woodstock

David Browne’s history gets lost in a haze; Peter Doggett’s focuses on the golden age

 Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young:  romantic lyrics and penchant for political protest galvanised a devoted following. Photograph:  Henry Diltz/Corbis

Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young: romantic lyrics and penchant for political protest galvanised a devoted following. Photograph: Henry Diltz/Corbis

There was a time when Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young were regarded as the ultimate supergroup, the equivalent of a latter-day American Beatles and the living embodiment of what was termed the “Woodstock generation”.

Acclaimed as masters of the acoustic ballad in the golden age of the singer-songwriter, they also offered a hard-rocking electric side crystallised in the fiery guitar interaction of Stills and Young. They brought a new sophistication to rock music at the end of the 1960s, utilising invaluable experience gained in classic groups such as the Byrds, the Hollies and Buffalo Springfield.

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.